How Jamie Oliver harnessed the power of YouTube

How Jamie Oliver harnessed the power of YouTube

Since 2013, Jamie Oliver's YouTube presence has gone from being barely noticeable to one of the platform's biggest food networks. Now with three channels and well over 2m subscribers, he has truly mastered the art of video marketing.

How has he managed it?


Rebranding

Jamie’s original YouTube channel was underused and certainly not consistent in terms of style or strategy. In fact, it was mostly used as way of integrating video content into his main website, resulting in an ad-hoc uploading schedule and miss-matched tone. Recognising these mistakes, Jamie decided to completely overhaul the channel, relaunching as FoodTube with a live half hour show in January 2013. Richard Herd, now Head of FoodTube, explained that keeping the content similar to how it would appear on television was a steep learning curve. 

Discovering data

Unlike television where it’s difficult to discover specific details about the viewer demographic, YouTube’s ability to tap into data allows for much greater insight. By delving into this data, FoodTube was able discover who exactly the audience was as well as what points they were switching on and off. As a result, a much more streamlined strategy was put in place.

Collaborating with others

One of the easiest ways for brands to expand their reach on YouTube is to collaborate, and while Jamie might already rank highly in terms of celebrity status, he’s not been afraid to collaborate with others. From Gennaro Contaldo to Alfie Deyes, his ‘Jamie and Co’ series has seen him team up with a wide range of faces from the world of YouTube and beyond.

Expanding the network

Despite uncertainty over the channel's ROI, Jamie has continued to grow his YouTube presence with the launch of two new channels – Drinks Tube and Family Food Tube respectively.


In terms of Jamie Oliver's future on YouTube, as long as his famous passion and enthusiasm for food is poured into all areas, there's no reason why it won't continue to flourish.



(Econsultancy.com)